Transum Maths Software

Sequences

There are 366 different Starters of The Day, many to choose from. You will find in the left column below some starters on the topic of Sequences. In the right column below are links to related online activities, videos and teacher resources.

A lesson starter does not have to be on the same topic as the main part of the lesson or the topic of the previous lesson. It is often very useful to revise or explore other concepts by using a starter based on a totally different area of Mathematics.

Main Page

Sequences Starters:

Add 'em: Add up a sequence of consecutive numbers. Can you find a quick way to do it?

House Numbers: The numbers on five houses next to each other add up to 70. What are those five numbers?

Missing Terms: Find the missing terms from these linear sequences.

One one: Continue the given number pattern with the help of a little lateral thinking.

Sea Shells: A question which can be best answered by using algebra.

Sequence Dancing: Find the next term of the number sequences.

Sign Sequences: Continue the sequences if you can work out the rule.

Spider Sequences: Find the next term of the given number sequences. Can you also find a general rule for predicting the nth term of the sequence?

To Be Continued: Work out the next term in the given sequences.

Windmill Sequence: Find the value of the missing term of the sequence. It is easier than you may think!

Advanced Sequences Starters

 

Small images of these Starters | | |  Complete Index of Starters

Featured Activity

Online Logo

Online Logo

An opportunity for students to write a computer program. There is nothing to download, all of the interaction takes place in the browser. Great for understanding angles and the properties of shapes.

 

Curriculum for Sequences:

Year 6

Pupils should be taught to generate and describe linear number sequences more...

Years 7 to 9

Pupils should be taught to generate terms of a sequence from either a term-to-term or a position-to-term rule more...

Pupils should be taught to recognise arithmetic sequences and find the nth term more...

Pupils should be taught to recognise geometric sequences and appreciate other sequences that arise. more...

Years 10 and 11

Pupils should be taught to recognise and use sequences of triangular, square and cube numbers, simple arithmetic progressions, Fibonacci type sequences, quadratic sequences, and simple geometric progressions (rn where n is an integer, and r is a positive rational number {or a surd}) {and other sequences} more...

Pupils should be taught to deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of linear {and quadratic} sequences. more...

Feedback:

Comment recorded on the 3 October 'Starter of the Day' page by Mrs Johnstone, 7Je:

"I think this is a brilliant website as all the students enjoy doing the puzzles and it is a brilliant way to start a lesson."

Comment recorded on the 28 September 'Starter of the Day' page by Malcolm P, Dorset:

"A set of real life savers!!
Keep it up and thank you!"

Comment recorded on the 19 November 'Starter of the Day' page by Lesley Sewell, Ysgol Aberconwy, Wales:

"A Maths colleague introduced me to your web site and I love to use it. The questions are so varied I can use them with all of my classes, I even let year 13 have a go at some of them. I like being able to access the whole month so I can use favourites with classes I see at different times of the week. Thanks."

Comment recorded on the 12 July 'Starter of the Day' page by Miss J Key, Farlingaye High School, Suffolk:

"Thanks very much for this one. We developed it into a whole lesson and I borrowed some hats from the drama department to add to the fun!"

Comment recorded on the 23 September 'Starter of the Day' page by Judy, Chatsmore CHS:

"This triangle starter is excellent. I have used it with all of my ks3 and ks4 classes and they are all totally focused when counting the triangles."

Comment recorded on the 9 October 'Starter of the Day' page by Mr Jones, Wales:

"I think that having a starter of the day helps improve maths in general. My pupils say they love them!!!"

Comment recorded on the 17 November 'Starter of the Day' page by Amy Thay, Coventry:

"Thank you so much for your wonderful site. I have so much material to use in class and inspire me to try something a little different more often. I am going to show my maths department your website and encourage them to use it too. How lovely that you have compiled such a great resource to help teachers and pupils.
Thanks again"

Comment recorded on the 7 December 'Starter of the Day' page by Cathryn Aldridge, Pells Primary:

"I use Starter of the Day as a registration and warm-up activity for my Year 6 class. The range of questioning provided is excellent as are some of the images.
I rate this site as a 5!"

Comment recorded on the 11 January 'Starter of the Day' page by S Johnson, The King John School:

"We recently had an afternoon on accelerated learning.This linked really well and prompted a discussion about learning styles and short term memory."

Comment recorded on the 2 May 'Starter of the Day' page by Angela Lowry, :

"I think these are great! So useful and handy, the children love them.
Could we have some on angles too please?"

Notes:

A pattern of numbers following a rule is called a sequence. There are many different types of sequence and this topic introduces pupils to some of them.

The most basic sequences of numbers is formed by adding a constant to a term to get the next term of the sequence. This rule can be expressed as a linear equation and the terms of the sequence when plotted as a series of coordinates forms a straight line. More complex sequences are investigated where the rule is not a linear function. Other well-known sequences includes the Fibonacci sequence where the rule for obtaining the next term depends on the previous two terms.

Sequences can be derived from shapes and patterns. A growing patterns of squares or triangles formed from toothpicks is often used to show linear sequences in a very practical way. Diagrams representing sequences provides interesting display material for the classroom.

Typically pupils are challenged to find the next term of a given sequence but a deeper understanding is needed to find intermediate terms, 100th term or the nth term of a sequence.

Sequences Teacher Resources:

Counter: A dynamic visual aid that counts! Choose the first term, common difference and the speed

Mystic Rose: Investigate the properties of the Mystic Rose by using this interactive diagram.

Sequence Generator: An online app which produces number sequences as words.

Sequences Activities:

Arithmetic Sequences: An exercise on linear sequences including finding an expression for the nth term and the sum of n terms.

Fibonacci Quest: A number of self marking quizzes based on the fascinating Fibonacci Sequence.

Geometric Sequences: An exercise on geometric sequences including finding the nth term and the sum of any number of terms.

Interest: Practise using the formulas for simple interest and compound interest.

Iteration: Find approximate solutions to equations numerically using iteration.

Matchstick Patterns: Create a formula to describe the nth term of a sequence by examining the structure of the diagrams.

Missing Terms: Can you work out which numbers are missing from these number sequences?

Quadratic Sequences: Deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of quadratic sequences.

Tower of Hanoi: Move the pieces of the tower from one place to another in the minimum number of moves.

Watsadoo: Rotate the cogs to catch the flying numbers in the correct sections.

Finally there is Topic Test, a set of 10 randomly chosen, multiple choice questions suggested by people from around the world.

Alternatively, for the more advanced student, there is an ever-growing collection of Exam-Style Questions with worked solutions on the topic of Sequences.

Sequences Investigations:

Aunt Lucy's Legacy: Decide which of the four schemes Aunt Lucy proposes will provide the most money. This investigation involves the sum of sequences as well as considering life expectancy.

Four Ever: Generate a number sequence based on the number of letters needed to spell the previous number.

Mystic Rose: Investigate the properties of the Mystic Rose by using this interactive diagram.

Steps: Investigate this growing sequence of steps.

Tower of Hanoi: Move the pieces of the tower from one place to another in the minimum number of moves.

Sequences Videos:

Nature By Numbers: Cristóbal Vila created this short animated film that deals with geometric formulas that appear in nature such as the Fibonacci Sequence.

The magic of Fibonacci numbers: Arthur Benjamin gives a TED talk on Fibonacci numbers.

Sequences Worksheets/Printables:

How Many Squares? 1: A printable grid containing many copies of the design used in the shape counting Starter.

How Many Squares? 2: A printable grid containing many copies of the design used in the second shape counting Starter.

Mystic Roses: Eighteen mystic roses to print out to help with the investigation.

Sequences External Links:

Links to other websites containing resources for Sequences are provided for those logged into 'Transum Mathematics'. Subscribing also opens up the opportunity for you to add your own links to this panel. You can sign up using one of the buttons below:

Search

The activity you are looking for may have been classified in a different way from the way you were expecting. You can search the whole of Transum Maths by using the box below.

 

 

 

 

Other

Is there anything you would have a regular use for that we don't feature here? Please let us know.

Recently Updated

Mixpressions

Mixpressions

Arrange the cards to create a valid mathematical statement. So far this activity has been accessed 9621 times and 33 people have earned a Transum Trophy for completing it.

 

Homepage

Have today's Starter of the Day as your default homepage. Copy the URL below then select
Tools > Internet Options (Internet Explorer) then paste the URL into the homepage field.

Set as your homepage (if you are using Internet Explorer)

 

Do you have any comments? It is always useful to receive feedback and helps make this free resource even more useful for those learning Mathematics anywhere in the world. Click here to enter your comments.

Starter Menu in English | French | Spanish |

Apple

©1997-2018 WWW.TRANSUM.ORG